Tag Archive | cooking

Cooking With Kids: Healthy Eating Starts in the Kitchen

by Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, FAND

Cooking can instill a sense of pride in kids.

Kids love to cook—and it might help them to make better food choices, too.

I think it’s fair to say that most kids—given the chance—like to spend time playing around in the kitchen. And why not? Cooking is creative and messy and fun, and it tickles all the senses. On top of that, your efforts are rewarded with something that’s (hopefully) delicious to eat. But cooking can deliver some additional benefits, too—spending time in the kitchen can help kids to develop an appreciation for healthy foods, and foster better eating habits, too.

RELATED ARTICLE: 12 smart tips for getting your kids heart healthy

The significance of this really shouldn’t be overlooked. In the last few decades, obesity and overweight rates among American kids have risen dramatically—a reflection, in part, on a diet that includes too many calories and nutrient-poor foods, and too little in the way of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and calcium-rich dairy products.

And eating out is a contributing factor. Meals eaten away from home are higher in calories, fat and saturated fat—and provide less calcium and fiber—than home-prepared meals. On the other hand, eating more meals at home is associated with a higher intake of fruits, vegetables and dairy products, with less fat and calories.

Cooking with Kids: The Many Benefits
    • Cooking at home and eating together helps kids develop an appreciation for healthy foods. When parents serve as good role models with their food choices, kids develop a similar appreciation for healthy foods. And, the comfortable, supportive environment of home helps to reinforce these healthy behaviors.
    • Kids enjoy eating what they’ve prepared. When kids are involved in the selection of ingredients and preparation of foods, they’re more likely to try their creations.
    • They’re more likely to try new foods. Even if kids decide that they don’t particularly like what they prepared, the cooking experience will help to cultivate an open mind when it comes to trying new foods.
    • Kids derive a sense of pride and independence when they cook. Kids love to boast that “I did it all myself!” When they are able to prepare something on their own—no matter how simple—and serve it to family, it instills a sense of pride and independence. Help your kids by guiding them toward age-appropriate recipes.
    • Cooking is creative. Once kids have some basic skills and learn to follow recipes, they should be encouraged to get creative. You can start with a very simple basic recipe—for example, a smoothie made with flavored protein powder and milk—and allow them to experiment by adding different fruits, vegetables, spices or extracts. Once they’ve come up with their own recipes, many kids enjoy creating their own recipe file.
    • Cooking together can be fun, quality time. Spending time together in the kitchen can be fun and relaxing for both kids and adults. Many kids don’t need much coaxing to join you in the kitchen, so use this time to simply enjoy each other’s company and talk about how good—and good for you—your meal is going to be.

Susan Bowerman is Director of Nutrition Training at Herbalife. Susan is a Registered Dietitian and a Board-Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics.

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12 Smart Tips to Get Your Kids Heart-Healthy

by Louis Ignarro, PhD

Encourage heart-healthy choices for your kids.

Moms and dads have dozens of concerns each day, ranging from their child’s performance in school to emotional development and happiness. Perhaps one of the biggest questions is: Am I doing enough to keep my child heart-healthy?

At the base of your child’s success and well-being is a healthy body. And one of the most important focuses of health—especially in children—is the heart. Here are twelve tips for helping your kids lead a heart-healthy life:

#1 Change things up

Children enjoy exploring different environments, so take your child to a local playground or indoor activity center to simply play. Being in a new, fun space encourages imagination and creativity, while giving your child the opportunity to get active and maybe even make new friends.

#2 Join in

Perhaps the greatest gifts you can give your child are your time, energy and attention. Instead of watching them play, join in. Not only will you be encouraging your kids to get and stay active, but you’ll be building your relationship, too.

#3 Sneak in healthy foods

If you have a picky eater, find ways to sneak into their meals and snacks some healthy foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy. Top whole-grain pasta with tomato sauce loaded with vegetables, make a delicious whole-fruit smoothie, or melt some low-fat cheese over assorted vegetables as a side with dinner. Replace white bread with whole-grain bread and swap cookies with sweet fruits like mango or pear.

#4 Make it a competition

Most kids love competing. Some families compete by having each member wear a pedometer, and then they tally up their weekly steps to see who “won” that week. You can even have prizes for winning, such as a special (healthy) lunch out with Mom or a pass on washing the dinner dishes for a night.

#5 Sleep more

Sleep is important for memory, concentration and general wellness—and it’s also necessary for keeping the heart healthy. Stick to a schedule, even on the weekends, to help encourage healthy sleep.

Suggested sleep times1:

– Toddlers (ages 1 to 3) should get 12 to 14 hours of sleep daily

– Preschoolers (ages 3 to 5) should get 11 to 13 hours

– School-age children (ages 5 to 10) should get 10 to 11 hours

– Teens (ages 10 to 17) should get 8.5 to 9.25 hours.

#6 Supplement a healthy diet

Your child might have additional nutritional needs that aren’t being met through diet. A health care provider should be able to help determine if your child is getting all of the nutrients he or she needs. If your child is falling short, a nutritional supplement may be a good option to support a heart-healthy life.

#7 Turn it off

Television takes up too much precious time. Each minute your kids sit in front of the TV is a minute they’re not being physically active. Limit screen time to encourage your kids to get moving.

#8 Use the screen wisely

If you own a video gaming system, you can opt for games that encourage movement. Join in the fun as your child dances, skis, bowls or plays another activity-based video game.

#9 Walk or pedal

Choose activities nearby so you can commute by foot. If that’s not an option, choose family outings that involve movement. A nice greenbelt stroll is free and fun. If it’s cold in your area, bundle up and enjoy nearly empty trails or walking paths.

#10 Keep it calm

Like adults, kids can get stressed out, too. Low stress levels are important for maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle, so make sure your child isn’t overloaded. While organized activities are important, it’s also good for your child to have down time. Read a book together, go on a leisurely walk, or play outside with the family dog.

#11 Cook together

Involve your child in cooking a healthy meal, and explain what each ingredient is and why it’s going into the dinner. Let them help mix, measure and prepare a heart-healthy family meal—chances are, they’ll be more likely to eat it.

#12 Inspire by example

Whether you know it or not, your child is watching your every move, learning how to interact with the world and developing habits that could extend for a lifetime. When you lead a healthy lifestyle, you are subtly encouraging your child to do the same. As you make good choices, discuss why you’re making your decisions. They really are listening!

***

By helping your son or daughter develop healthy habits, you are giving the gift of lifelong vitality. Start encouraging heart-healthy habits when they’re young by working in healthy lifestyle choices—including good nutrition, regular physical activity, plenty of sleep and low stress levels. And do the same in your own life!

Written by Louis Ignarro, Ph.D.  Dr. Ignarro is a member of both the Editorial and Nutrition Advisory Boards of the Herbalife Nutrition Institute and receives compensation for his endorsement of Herbalife® products. 

[1] http://www.sleepfoundation.org/article/how-sleep-works/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need

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30 minutes to healthy, with our quick meal ideas!

 30 minute meal ideas to get dinner on the table, fast!

by Susan Bowerman, Registered Dietitian and a Board-Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics.

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Preparing healthy meals doesn’t have to mean hours in the kitchen. When your freezer, refrigerator and kitchen cupboards are well stocked, you can easily whip up a healthy meal in just 30 minutes.

Setting aside time to prepare a healthy meal at home may sound like an impossible task – especially if you think it’s going to require hours of your time, and it can sometimes seem easier to eat out or order a takeaway. But doing this can make healthy eating a lot more difficult, so I’m going to show you how to make 9 healthy meals in 30 minutes or less. Not only will this save you money, but it also gives you complete control over ingredients, calories and portions, to help you reach your health and weight loss goals.

What to Keep in Your Freezer:

  • Fish fillets: easy to use, since they don’t need to be thawed before cooking.
  • Prawns: cooked or raw, and ideal for soups, salads, and stir-fries.
  • Frozen vegetables: great for sprinkling into soups, pasta dishes or omelettes. My favourites are spinach, broccoli and peas.
  • Frozen fruit: good for adding to smoothies, Formula 1 shakes or stirring into yoghurt.

TOP TIP: Frozen banana can be blended up as a delicious healthy alternative to ice cream.

What to Keep in Your Refrigerator:

  • Milk (cow’s milk, soy milk or almond milk) for Formula 1 shakes or smoothies.
  • Eggs for omelettes or added to soups.
  • Greek-style yoghurt is a great alternative for sour cream, and is a delicious snack with some fruit.
  • Citrus fruits and apples are fairly long-lasting. Add fruits to salads for a nice flavour contrast, and use citrus fruits such as lemons and limes in cooking for extra flavour.
  • Peppers, celery and carrots usually last longer than leafy vegetables, and can be eaten with a meal or as a snack: raw, chopped and enjoyed with houmous.
  • Pre-washed salad greens such as spinach, kale or cabbage are convenient for putting together a side salad in minutes.

What to Keep in Your Cupboard:

  • Chopped tomatoes make a great base for soups and homemade pasta sauces.
  • Tinned kidney beans, black beans and chickpeas are great for making soup, curry or houmous.
  • Quick-cooking whole grains such as brown rice, millet, quinoa, couscous, whole grain pasta make great high-fibre side dishes.
  • Tinned tuna adds extra protein to salads or pasta dishes, and can be used to make homemade fishcakes too.
  • Vinegars such as apple cider vinegar are great for adding flavour and provide many health benefits too.
  • Dried herbs and spices provide endless flavour variations.
  • Chicken and vegetable stock – great for adding flavour to pasta sauces and soups.
  • Extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil etc. are all good for cooking everything from meat to stir-fried vegetables.
  • Onions and garlic – the flavour stapes that should be stored in a cool, dark place.

TOP TIP: Make your own healthy salsa by frying diced onion and garlic, then mixing with a couple tablespoons chopped tomatoes, diced avocado and herbs.

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30 MINUTE MEAL IDEAS

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Once you’ve got all your basics, it’s time to let your imagination run wild. Since none of these recipes require extended cooking times, it shouldn’t take more than 30 minutes to prepare your healthy meal. Here are some of my favourite recipes for putting a delicious, healthy meal on the table quickly.

Curried vegetables and chickpeas.

Saute ½ diced onion, and one 1 diced courgette in olive oil until soft. Add two tomatoes, seeded and chopped and season with curry powder, ginger, garlic, cumin, cinnamon and cayenne. Add a can of chickpeas (drained), 125ml chicken or vegetable stock and a squeeze of fresh lemon. Add frozen spinach leaves, cover and cook until heated thoroughly. Adjust seasonings to taste, and serve on with quick-cook brown rice and a tbsp of Greek-style yogurt.

Pasta with tomato sauce and prawns.

Drain a large can of chopped tomatoes and sauté in a little olive oil over medium-high heat for 10-15 minutes until soft enough to mash with a fork. Season with salt, pepper, garlic and basil, then add frozen prawns and cook in the sauce until the prawns are cooked through. Serve on whole wheat pasta.

Vegetable egg cups.

This dish makes an easy, light dinner with a salad on the side. Coat a muffin tin with olive oil. In each muffin cup, add a few tablespoons of any chopped vegetables you like (e.g. frozen spinach or broccoli, with fresh onions and peppers). Beat one egg for each muffin cup you prepare, then pour the egg mixture over the vegetables and bake at 375 degrees (gas mark 5) for about 20 minutes until puffed and golden.

Tuna fishcakes.

Mix flaked tinned tuna with chopped vegetables, light sour cream (or Greek-style yoghurt), whole grain bread crumbs, Dijon mustard and lemon. Form into patties and cook in a little oil until brown on both sides.

Quick black bean soup.

Saute ½ chopped onion in a little olive oil until soft. Add a can of black beans (drained), 500ml chicken broth and season with cumin, garlic, oregano and heat thoroughly. Mash some of the beans with a fork then add to the liquid to thicken the soup. Enjoy topped with some Greek-style yoghurt, diced avocado and a spoonful of salsa.

Glazed chicken fillets.

Season small chicken fillets with salt and pepper. Heat a little olive oil in a large skillet and add the chicken in a single layer. Brown the chicken on one side, then turn the chicken over and add a few tablespoons of water, chicken/vegetable stock, balsamic vinegar or lemon juice. Cover, lower the heat and cook for 5 minutes until cooked through. Remove chicken pieces from skillet, turn heat back to high and cook juices until reduced to a glaze. Turn off heat, add chicken pieces back to pan and turn to coat. Serve with vegetables and a high-fibre grain such as quinoa.

Fish tacos.

Rinse frozen fish fillets quickly to remove any ice. Pat dry, season with salt and pepper and sauté in a little oil until browned on one side. Turn, cover and cook until fish can be flaked easily with a fork. While fish is cooking, mix some pre-shredded cabbage with a little olive oil, lime juice, pinch of sugar, salt and pepper. Top corn tortillas with fish, cabbage mixture and salsa.

Quick soba noodle soup.

Heat 1 litre vegetable or chicken stock with a dash of soy sauce, sprinkle of ginger, garlic powder, white pepper and a drizzle of sesame oil. Bring to the boil, then add 90g dry soba noodles and cook until noodles are almost done. Add diced tofu or frozen prawns, a handful of frozen peas and some frozen spinach and continue cooking until heated through. For extra protein, add a beaten egg at the last minute – it will cook quickly in the heated stock.

Curried tuna and whole grain salad.

A nice meal for a warm evening. Choose your favourite whole grain (couscous or quinoa are particularly good for this) and once cooked and cooled, mix with chopped vegetables (try spring onion, cucumber and carrots) and tinned tuna (drained). Add some diced fruit (apple, orange or mango) and dress with olive oil, rice vinegar, curry powder, salt and pepper.

Susan Bowerman is Director of Nutrition Training at Herbalife. Susan is a Registered Dietitian and a Board-Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics.

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SASA’S HEALTHY EATING INFO- VIDEO: Kalettes: A brand new vegetable you should know about | Herbalife Healthy Eating Advice

Kalettes: A brand new vegetable you should know about | Herbalife Healthy Eating Advice

Learn more about Kalettes, a brand new hybrid vegetable, easy to cook, and full of nutrition and flavor! Kalettes are a hybrid of kale and brussels sprouts. They have a delicious sweet nutty flavor and can be cooked in a number of different ways.

In this video, Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, FAND gives you the breakdown on kalettes and provides tips on how to prepare them!

Kalettes were developed over 15 years in the UK. They’re a leafy green vegetable with a flavorful combination of nutty and sweet and they’re very nutritious. Kalettes are good source of vitamin B6, calcium, vitamin C, and vitamin K.

To prepare kalettes for cooking or eating, begin by cutting off the bottom of the stalk. That will ensure you have a nice fresh cut at the bottom of your vegetable. Kalettes are nice and tender so you may eat them raw if you like. You may also steam, stir fry, grill, sauté, or roast kalettes.

Here are a few ideas for cooking with kaletttes:
• Roasted kalettes – toss them with a little bit of olive oil, salt and pepper and put them in a really hot oven for about 10-12 minutes.
• Substitute bok choy with kalettes in your favorite stir fry dish.
• Add them to your favorite baked pasta dish.
• Eat them raw and toss them in your favorite salad.
• Substitute spinach with kalettes in your frittata.

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VIDEO: A cooking guide for using fresh herbs and dried herbs | Herbalife Advice

A cooking guide for using fresh herbs and dried herbs | Herbalife Advice

When a recipe calls for an herb like basil or thyme, do you use fresh herbs or dried herbs? I’m Susan Bowerman and today we’re talking about the differences between fresh herbs and dried herbs.

Fresh herbs:
– When herbs are very fresh, their flavors and aromas are at their peak.
– Fresh herbs are more perishable, you might waste some if you don’t use them.
– Fresh herbs are good if you’re eating them raw, such as adding fresh dill in a salad.
– When you’re ready to use fresh herbs, just strip the leaves from the stems and add them to your dish whole or minced.

Dried herbs:
– Dried herbs are more concentrated so you would use less than you would with fresh herbs.
– Dried herbs can take longer cooking time than fresh herbs; you can add dried herbs while you are cooking. Fresh herbs on the other hand are better added towards the end of cooking.
– Dried herbs don’t spoil, but they can lose their potency over time. Store them in a cool, dark place and sniff them periodically to see if they’ve lost their aroma.
– Dried herbs should be crushed a little bit before you add to cooking. Roll them around on your hand to release some of the flavor and then add to your dish.

I hope this cleared up some notions about fresh herbs vs. dried herbs.

For more nutrition advice from Herbalife contact me today!

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WATCH THIS VIDEO: Adding flavor without calories: The best vinegars for cooking

Adding flavor without calories: The best vinegars for cooking

In the quest to add flavor without calories, vinegar is one of the best options within your pantry. With a little more knowledge about the different kinds of vinegars, their flavor profiles and suggested uses, you’ll have lots of fun experimenting in the world of vinegar. Soon your dishes will spring to life.

Vinegars come in a wide variety of flavors as they are made not only from fermented fruit (apples, grapes) but also from fermented grain (malt, rice). The fermentation process creates the intensity of flavor and each vinegar type contributes significantly to your dish, whether it’s a simple dressed salad or a grilled salmon entrée.

You’ll find that some vinegars are aged for a mellow, sweeter flavor. Others are ideal for home pickling. No matter which kind of vinegar you use most frequently, it’s time to experiment with new ones!

Susan Bowerman offers lots of great tips for adding flavor to food without a lot of calories—find more videos in this Blog!

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SASA’S NUTRITION TIPS: 3 ways to help your fruit and vegetables pack a nutrient punch!

3 ways to help your fruit and vegetables pack a nutrient punch!

 03 Nov 2014   Posted by Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, FAND

3 ways to help your fruit and vegetables pack a nutrient punch! Herbalife nutrition adviceThe way you select, store and prepare your fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards locking in the most nutrition – and will help you get the most nutritional benefit from the fruits and vegetables that you eat. This week, I’m looking at how you can lock in the nutrients in fruit and vegetables.

In order to keep the most nutrients in your fruits and vegetables, it’s sometimes helpful to understand how those nutrients can get lost in the first place. Fruits and vegetables can lose some of their nutritional value if they’re not properly handled.

For example, exposure to air, light and water can cause the loss of some nutrients, while short cooking times at moderate temperatures helps to keep nutrients in. And, in some cases, the way you prepare your foods can even make nutrients more usable by the body.

How to Shop for Fruits and Vegetables to Keep Nutrients In

Choosing the freshest fruits and vegetables is the first step in making sure the nutrients are locked in. The freshest fruits and vegetables are easy to spot – they’re free of blemishes and soft spots, they’re firm, and their colors are bright rather than dull. And, the freshest fruits and vegetables will have had the least exposure to air, light and water – all of which can cause nutrient losses.

Buying fruits and vegetables in season is a good idea, too. When you buy fruits and vegetables out of season, they’ve had a long way to travel from the farm to your fork – time in which valuable nutrients can be lost. If you’re fortunate to have a farmer’s market available to you, try to take advantage. In most cases, the fruits and vegetables are fresher and more locally sourced, which means less chance of nutrient losses.

When fresh fruits and vegetables aren’t available, keep in mind that frozen fruits and veggies actually retain their nutrients quite well – in some cases, frozen produce may actually offer more nutrition than fresh. For one thing, fruits and vegetables that are headed for the freezer case are usually picked at their peak of ripeness – a time when they’re most nutrient-packed. And they’re processed very quickly after picking and then flash-frozen, which locks in freshness and nutrients.

How to Prepare Fruits and Vegetables to Keep Nutrients In

When it’s time to prepare, lightly wash – but don’t soak – your fruits and vegetables. If the first utensil you tend to grab is your peeler, you might want to reconsider. The skins and peels of fruits and vegetables are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fiber. There’s no need to peel foods like apples, potatoes, carrots and cucumbers – and even foods that we usually do peel, like eggplant or kiwifruit – have edible skins. With citrus fruits, grate some of the tangy zest into salads and cooked vegetables to get a healthy dose of antioxidants, and don’t pare away the spongy white interior of the citrus peel – it’s full of water-soluble fiber.

Watch what you cut away, too. There’s more vitamin C and calcium in broccoli stems than the florets, more nutrients in asparagus stalks than the tips, and the hard center core of a pineapple has the highest concentration of bromelain, a natural enzyme which aids digestion.

Some nutrients – particularly, a group of antioxidants known as carotenoids – are more available for the body when foods are lightly processed through chopping or cooking.

The carotenoid lycopene for example – which gives tomatoes their red color – is more readily usable by the body when it’s obtained from cooked tomatoes than it is from raw. And your body will take up more lutein (a carotenoid that gives the yellow-green color to foods like spinach and kiwifruit) from chopped spinach than it will from whole spinach leaves.

A tiny amount of fat helps with the absorption of carotenoids, too, so a few slices of avocado in your spinach salad, or a little olive oil in your tomato sauce will boost your uptake.

How to Cook Fruits and Vegetables to Keep Nutrients In

When it’s time to cook vegetables (or fruits), the key to retaining nutrients is to use methods that require the least water. Steaming is one of the best techniques. Since the food never comes in contact with the water, steaming helps to preserve precious water-soluble B vitamins and vitamin C.

Microwaving also uses very little water and – despite popular misconception – microwaving does not destroy nutrients. With either method, use as little water as you can. The other advantage to these methods is that they’re quick – shorter cooking times help preserve nutrients. For this reason, stir-frying your vegetables is also a good option to lock nutrients in.

Pairing your seasonings with your vegetables can boost nutrition, too, since the thousands of different antioxidants in plant foods work together to protect your health. So add garlic to your broccoli, lemon peel to your green beans, or parsley to your carrots. Along with a flavor boost, you’ll get more nutritional value from your vegetables, too.

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HERBALIFE= NUTRITION FOR A BETTER LIFE!
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since 1994

Sasa 2010_HER
Helping you enjoy a healthy, active and successful life!
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